What’s the difference between being spontaneous and impromptu? Both are valuable skills when you’re at a conference – and especially shooting video.

Impromptu: Done without being planned, organized or rehearsed

Spontaneous: Having an open, natural and uninhibited manner

Sylvia Clare, Author of Trusting Your Intuition: Rediscover Your True Self to Achieve a Richer, More Rewarding Life says: “Being spontaneous is being able to respond with confidence; calmly trusting that, whatever the outcome, you will have a positive if challenging experience that will lead to greater self-awareness and success.”

I say, yup. I’m on board with that, especially if you’re trying to capture real time content at a conference and have an amazing videographer like Ellen Lacey from NewTV for only two hours!

It must have been my lucky day, because the booth in front of ours was empty. We didn’t have the nerve to take it over for the entire day, but we did manage to make it HQ for Robin’s Rainmakers videotaping.

The question to all attendees on the hot seat: What’s your biggest marketing challenge?

  • How can I get more engagement with my cause on a local level?
  • What do I have to do to grow my expert status as a scientist?
  • How do I become the go-to person at work?  (Hint: Candy works, but getting the job done rates higher)
  • What do I have to do to get my boss to notice me so I can get a raise?

The questions and answers were on the spot. Live on camera. I’ve never interviewed in this style before, but I liked that is was natural and almost the same as mentoring a client on the phone or in person. Ideas flow whether you catch them on paper in the middle of the night, in a conversation, get an intuitive hit or remember a fact or figure from years of study or experience. Being open to answers and trying new approaches is vital in video – being impromptu and spontaneous just like real engagement, live.

When you really think about it, what’s the big deal? You wave your hand in front of the camera when you make a mistake. You go with the flow. You have fun and stop being so serious.

Remember, we’re human and people are comfortable with like-minded souls who aren’t afraid of getting out there and learning from experts willing to share. Plus, when it comes down to it, we’re all really experts in training.

My hot seat advice as I write this? Let’s all learn from each other and have a good time doing it.

I haven’t met a smarty pants in years.

If you’re in the market to buy promotional products to increase your company’s brand awareness at a trade show, event or conference, it’s important to know the most common mistakes people make – so you can avoid them like the plague.

Over the last 20 years, I’ve seen the simplest jobs go wrong because of a mix up of facts, colors, formats and more.

Take a few minutes and read what the mistakes are so your order comes out exactly as you expect, at the price you want and on time!

Lack of purpose

With millions of promotional products to choose from it’s important to know the purpose of your promotional product campaign. Do you want to increase traffic to your website, landing page or promote a special offer? Based on your answer, you may be surprised that a different product, design or distribution plan may be a better idea. Without a clear goal and purpose, your marketing campaign could be doomed to fail before it really begins.

Not tailored to your audience

A custom beer koozie is a great premium for a bar or brewery, but not necessarily on target with a hospital’s image. I’ve seen buyers select premiums that are cool in their eyes, but just don’t fit. When this happens, marketers are appealing to their own taste rather than their audience’s. Take time to research the interest and hobbies of your target demographic and find a product that will appeal to them. Not sure?  Create an informal focus group!

Bland or generic design

Does your freebie or premium have visual interest? Whether it’s colorful, has a catchy slogan or pattern, you want to be sure your product gets attention and a positive reaction. If you create a giveaway that’s boring and uninteresting, chances are you’ve wasted a timely marketing opportunity. Remember, one of the goals of giving a promotional product is to create interest – in the product, service and the item itself!

What’s your distribution plan?

Before you even order promotional products, determine what you’re going to do with them. Will you give them out at a trade show or will reps hand them out to customers in the field? Are you trying to increase your customer’s loyalty by sending a product in the mail or attract a new prospect, in a totally new target market? No matter how you answer these questions, you can be select in your distribution. And, remember to keep at least a few samples in your file cabinet with important facts like where you gave them out, when and feedback. (You can use an excel spreadsheet too).

Ordering cheap items

Most promo products are fairly inexpensive and cost effective as compared to other types of marketing. I know it’s tempting to save as much money as possible and buy the cheapest products available, but sacrificing quality for quantity can actually cost you more in the long run. Be mindful that what you give out is a reflection of your brand, so going cheap isn’t always the way to go. I’m not asking you to break the bank or your budget, but here’s the deal: Your product needs to be effective, before it can be cost effective.

Printing ineffective information

This sounds like a no brainer, but don’t forget to include your website and contact information on the promotional item. The best product at the best price will be wasted if people can’t reach you. Granted, you have limited printing space to work with, so make every word count to reach your goal. A call to action isn’t a marketing maybe, it’s a marketing must! Premiums and promotional items included.

Not proofing carefully

How carefully are you reviewing the proof your promotional company is sending you? Take it from me, you may want to enlist others in your company to take a look too. Triple check the ink and PMS colors as well the actual imprint position. Once you’ve signed off on a proof and the job is in progress, additional changes will mean tossing out the old, and beginning from scratch. And, you know you’ll have to pay extra unless it’s not your fault.

Being stingy on quantities

Don’t be afraid to order a few extra premiums to have on hand for future events and surprise trade shows or meetings. Most vendors offer quantity price breaks where the price per piece decreases as the quantity increases. A company can often save 10 to 15 percent on an order by just adding more product. Plan out your event calendar and product purchases ahead of time and you can save big time.

Pay rush charges

This is one of the biggest mistakes marketers make and one of the easiest ways to reduce costs. Think and plan ahead! A typical production facility schedules weeks in advance so when a rush order comes in changes must be made immediately at the plant. A standard rush order can result in charges of 25% or more. A next day change for your million-dollar client can be – well, you don’t want to know. I’ve done it and saved the day and you could too. When you’re not in panic mode, ship by ground to avoid high freight charges. If you’re going to fly premiums overnight, why not save the money and travel yourself?

The bottom line is this.  Don’t rush through the planning stages of your promotional products campaign. Effective event purchasing can give you the results you’re looking if you use these tips on your checklist before you buy.

About the Author

Rachel Leone is a client and President of Leone Marketing.  Her firm specializes in finding perfect promotional products for trade shows and events to increase brand awareness, loyalty and recognition.  Rachel works with Fortune 500 brands as well as small business owners to engage, without a diamond ring. Her brainstorming sessions are noteworthy and complimentary. Contact Rachel at [email protected].

Although you may think that makeup is for those who just want to look better on TV, it’s really a must have for anyone who’s being photographed, filmed or on stage.  For most women, it’s also a normal part of their beauty routine.

Applying makeup for television requires different techniques so that you stand out, but don’t fade out.

The goal is to create a soft, polished look that will photograph well under the unforgiving television lights and today’s high definition cameras.

10 Makeup Tips for Stage, Style and TV

  1. Prep skin with an oil free primer.  It will not only make the skin appear to be smoother, it will help your makeup last longer.
  2. Choose a foundation that is a perfect color match.  You want to create even coverage and a natural look by blending.   Apply only what you need, not too much.  Be sure you bring foundation down on your neck to avoid a line.
  3. Go easy on the concealer, especially under the eyes, the right amount will cover any dark circles and even out your skin tone.   Be sure the color is not too light.
  4. A colorless powder will set your foundation.  (Never use a silica based powder under the bright lights on television, they may make white splotches appear on your skin.)  Powder your T-zone to control shine.
  5.   Neutral shades of eyeshadow are the best.  Go over all the edges multiple times with your brush.  If you’re using two shades, run your brush over both of them to meld the colors together.
  6. Highlight under your brow to give the eye a lift.  Add a touch to the inside corners of your eyes to brighten.
  7. Perfect your brows.  Trim any stray hairs and use a power, pencil or balm to define.  If you use a pencil, draw short lines that mimic tiny hairs and use a spoolie brush to blend.
  8. Line your eyes with a neutral brown, grey or black liner.  Apply mascara from root to tip of lashes.  A natural looking false lash will add a nice touch and make your eyes more defined.
  9. Apply blush to the apples of your cheeks.  Blend, blend, blend for a natural look.
  10. Avoid dark matte lip colors, choose a soft color.  Line the lips with a pencil and fill the entire lip in with the pencil.  Finish off with a sheer gloss over the pencil.  It will make your lips appear moist on camera.

This is from me:

Charlotte headshotI hope you enjoyed these great tips from Charlotte for when you want to go on camera!

She’s sending one of her top makeup artists to my house when my daughter gets married in a couple of weeks.   A little about Charlotte?  She works for TV networks, Broadway and is on call when celebrities and world leaders come to Boston.  Her traveling beauty team is amazing and she’s won awards from The Knot and Wedding Wire six years in a row! Check out her website.

Are you getting married, going on stage of shooting a video series?

Picture perfect is the only way to go!

I wanted to share an article I wrote about sponsoring events, as it’s often a great way to get eyeballs and you know what in seats. I published it a while back, but the content is just as valid today as it was then. Hope you enjoy!

As you may already know, sponsorship opportunities can be a cost-effective way to build equity in your company’s brand, which in turn helps drive increased market share, mind share, sales, revenues and profits.

However, while sponsorships can be very rewarding – whether by lending your company name to an event, participating as a joint venture partner/underwriter, or through any other vehicle – it’s wise to “look before you leap” and ask yourself these 7 questions to help ensure that the effort is a win for everyone involved:

  1. “Is this a good fit for us?” Evaluate the fit between the sponsorship opportunity and your company’s mission and goals. There should be clear alignment.
  1. “Will we reach the right people?” As with any marketing idea or project, you want to ensure that this sponsorship opportunity will let you engage the right target audience for where your company is right now in its strategic marketing plan.
  1. “Can we make this happen?” Despite you and your team’s best intentions and efforts, you need to take into consideration a number of logistical, financial and administrative factors, including: timing, expense, logistics, workload, and staff. Think with you head AND your heart!
  1. “What kind of support is available?” Do some research on the event organizers to see what kind of support is available. Will they co-produce marketing material to offset your costs? Can they give you access to discounted media rates? It’s also a good idea to ask for testimonials from other satisfied sponsors.
  1. “Who will we be up against?” Find out which other brands are involved in the event, and if there are any speakers (e.g. workshops, lectures, etc.). Pay particular attention on whether any of these people might enhance or, in some cases, may detract or damage your brand.
  1. “How many people will we connect with?” Find out how many people have registered, and whether there’s a guarantee on the number who will attend. Also look into how the event is being promoted, and whether your company will be featured as part of that effort.
  1. “What’s the ROI?” While there are many different ways to measure ROI (much to the bane of some CFOs out there), the important thing to confirm is that there is, in fact, an ROI that makes sense per your strategic marketing plan. For example, if your goal is to increase top-of-funnel leads by 15% next quarter, then see how the potential sponsorship opportunity supports that. Or, if your priority is to increase brand recognition by 20% among your key demographic, then evaluate the opportunity through that lens. Whatever your goal, the point here is that you want to think about ROI before you commit to sponsoring – not after.

The Bottom Line

Ultimately, all 7 questions above point to one clear piece of advice: do your homework! That doesn’t mean you should spend weeks or months analyzing every potential sponsorship opportunity. However, it does mean that it’s clearly in your best interest to position your brand for maximum success – and that includes measuring results and conducting a “lessons learned” after each event, so that you’re constantly getting better at the sponsorship game, year after year.

It’s so much fun to see clients update their brands and showcase their expertise. One of the ways we’ve been helping business owners do this is with their e-books, and promoting them to their target audience.

One of my colleagues and clients is Ceri Rueneck from www.ItsYourCall.com 

Ceri is an expert at business to business telemarketing; cold calling, lead qualification, lead nurturing and trade show event follow up. She’s a powerhouse of information on the subject, as well as a speaker, trainer and yes – an author with her e-book, Cold Calling for the Clueless.

We targeted Ceri’s e-book via national media release to her target audience; the industrial market, manufacturing/production, enterprise software, and electronics and multimedia, to name a few. In the release, we highlighted her expertise, quoted her as an authority, and offered a link to download a complimentary copy of her e-book.

Every click drives traffic to her website and blog, provides her team with sales leads, and showcases her as an expert for speaking engagements – not to mention it’s a great press opportunity to build her brand.

I got an email from Ceri this morning letting me know that a request for her e-book came in from a business in South Africa. How fun.

Take what’s in your brain and put it on paper. Collect what you’ve been writing and gather it in one place. Re-purpose your content to make a product and share your expertise.

An e-book is just one way to showcase your brand. Ceri’s brand just went international.

How ‘bout your brand? Up for the challenge?

I’m in the middle of planning a promotional campaign for my events company, Partner Promotions, and am always open to new ideas that are presented to me. Sometimes I find them (or they find me) in the least expected places. One such moment came on Saturday, as I was perusing the colorful fruit aisles at BJ’s.

Relaxed, and in my own world, I couldn’t help but notice the lush display of pineapples, which happened to be my Dad’s favorite fruit. Quickly, I was taken back to my younger years, watching my Dad carve the fruit into shapes that delighted me. The sweetness of the fruit and his artful presentation always brought me joy.

As my subconscious mind remembered the past, my conscious mind clicked into gear and remembered the pineapple as the international symbol of hospitality. At $1.99 each, my mind raced. The pineapple could not only be a unique promotional piece, but a sweet deal as well!

These lovely pineapples (with a fun and targeted companion printed piece) will most likely be my kick off promotional piece sent to PR agencies, Ad agencies or major companies that need “hospitality” at events. Golf tournaments, sports events, grand openings, trade shows, business expos or community initiatives. Let’s face it, hospitality is working with people. Putting your best foot forward with Brand Ambassadors who are meeters and greeters, spread goodwill, and welcome friends and prospects alike, who may one day be fans or buying customers.

Thinking out of the box and being authentic with your own message works.

That is, if you work it.

Your message to the core of who you are.

How sweet is that?