Robin Samora Inc.’s marketing and branding division Let’s Make You Shine is funding a scholarship to enable three women to attend the “Mom Gets a Business Conference,” which will take place on April 26 in New York City.

Boston-based branding, promotions and PR company Robin Samora Inc. announced today that it is funding a scholarship in partnership with the upcoming “Mom Gets a Business Conference,” which will take place on April 26 in New York City.

Robin Samora Inc.’s scholarship will be awarded via the company’s marketing and branding divison “Let’s Make You Shine,” and will enable three women to attend the conference who, due to financial reasons, would otherwise be unable to go.

“As an entrepreneur and a mother who has successfully built an established branding, promotions and PR company with a national reach – and raised two amazing kids along the way — I know all about the challenges of balancing career aims, personal goals, and the countless responsibilities of being a mom,” commented Robin Samora Inc.’s principal Robin Samora. “It’s an honor to help three deserving women attend the Mom Gets a Business Conference, and enable them to access advice, insight and knowledge that will turn their woman-owned business dreams into a reality – one that aligns with their role as a great mom, rather than competes with it.”

“We’re proud to showcase Robin Samora Inc. as an organization that supports women as they endeavor to improve their life and create freedom and financial stability, while honoring their goals as individuals and mothers,” commented Patty Lennon, founder of the Mom Gets a Business Conference, which will be held on April 26 at the 3 West Club, on 3 West 51st Street in New York City.

For more information or media inquiries, contact Robin Samora at (617) 921-3448 or
Robin(at)RobinSamoraInc(dot)com.

About Robin Samora Inc.

Telling a story is personal. Sharing it is an art. Technology makes it global. Robin Samora Inc., a Boston based branding, promotions and PR company blends all three to take its clients’ businesses and brands to the next level. With clients like Comcast, WBZ-TV and Blue Man Group, and a roster of authors, entrepreneurs and experts nationwide, the firm prides itself on being a “Promotional GPS” that takes its clients’ brands where they want to go to be seen, heard, engaged and remembered. With over two decades
of experience, the firm is as comfortable on major media highways as it is on out-of-the-way niche back roads.

Complimentary 30-minute PR assessment sessions from Boston-based marketing, PR and communications company Robin Samora Inc. provides professionals with clarifying insights into where their brand is now and where it’s headed tomorrow.  The sessions are offered for a limited time and available on a “first come, first served” basis.

Robin Samora Inc., a Boston-based marketing, PR and communications company that has partnered with Fortune 500 corporations, entrepreneurs, business owners, experts and authors for over 20 years, is now offering complimentary PR assessment sessions for a limited time.

The 30-minute telephone assessment sessions, which are offered on a “first come, first served” basis, are personally led by Robin Samora, who is a recognized authority on creating fresh and engaging marketing and PR campaigns that connect brands, consumers and the media. It’s all part of a campaign to mark the recent incorporation of Samora’s two companies, Partner Promotions and Let’s Make You Shine, respectively, as divisions within the Robin Samora Inc. brand.

“Through our Partner Promotions Inc. and Let’s Make You Shine divisions, we can now offer our clients – whether they’re Fortune 500 enterprises, success-minded business owners or expert authors — the best of both worlds,” commented Robin Samora. “With Partner Promotions, we help them achieve a deeper engagement with their audience, and with Let’s Make You Shine, we make their brands more visible. It’s complete, comprehensive support and leadership that helps our clients boost their credibility, mind share, competitive advantage, volume of quality leads and, of course, revenues, sales and profits.”

Professionals who take advantage of the PR assessment sessions will be provided with “straight talk” that helps them identify where they are now, where they want to go, and why they want to get there.

“The assessment sessions are a bit like a hot seat call, and so professionals should be prepared to be frank and take plenty of notes,” added Samora. “At the same time, it’s interactive, progressive and fun. I see my role as a PR light bulb that flicks on for 30 minutes, and illuminates the landscape so that they can see new PR opportunities – and potential threats – with renewed clarity.”

Professionals can request their complimentary 30-minute PR assessment session by sending an inquiry via the Robin Samora Inc. website at: http://www.robinsamorainc.com/pr-assessment/

For more information or media inquiries, contact Robin Samora at (617) 921-3448 or Robin(at)RobinSamoraInc(dot)com.

About Robin Samora Inc.

Telling a story is personal. Sharing it is an art. Technology makes it global. Robin Samora Inc., a Boston based PR, branding and promotions firm blends all three to take its clients’ businesses and brands to the next level. With clients like Comcast, WBZ-TV and Blue Man Group, and a roster of authors, entrepreneurs and experts nationwide, the firm prides itself on being a “Promotional GPS” that takes its clients’ brands where they want to go to be seen, heard, engaged and remembered. With over two decades of experience, the firm is as comfortable on major media highways as it is on out-of-the-way niche back roads.

As I write this, I am smiling knowing what’s behind the curtain. You may not notice it in my new photo taken by my friend and celebrity photographer Nikki Incandela, www.nikkiincandela.com, but it’s there. And, when I saw it, I started to wonder.

How many things don’t we see, that actually are there? Is it that we’re focused on something else or simply too busy? What don’t we see in our relationships with others, or scary enough, in ourselves?

Sometimes what we don’t see, or pay attention to is what’s begging for us to take notice. A business  opportunity that’s shouts our name, an important conversation with a loved one, an overdue phone call connecting to a colleague who’s been MIA for a while.  And the list goes on.

Why is it that we see what we see, and not always what others do?

As a photographer with a keen eye, Nikki saw Lucy, my sweet and elderly Sheltie behind the curtain. She never said much, but presented me one day with triptych images of Lucy’s face – which made me love them both, all the more.

In this case, what was behind the curtain delighted me.

We see what we need to see, for what we need to learn. I asked Nikki to photograph me so I could have a special memory of where I was in my life, to honor the space and place. These images will always be cherished as it was not only a new me she was capturing, but included a glimpse of Lucy at nearly 14 years old. I’ll always remember Lucy in the cool spot of the wood floor near the window, in a cottage that will forever remain dear to my heart.

What’s behind the curtain just is.  It’s what we think of it that holds power.

Happy almost December, let the twinkling begin,

I’ll be with my promotions team on Saturday, December 1, managing the Amazing Race TV auditions for WBZ-TV in Boston.  If you’d like to try out in person at one of two Massachusetts locations, click here (should we shorten this?? ) http://boston.cbslocal.com/contests/amazing-race-casting-call-at-bernie-phyls for details and an application.

Visit me too at the Massachusetts Conference For Women, on Thursday, December 6th.  Partner Promotions /Let’s Make You Shine will have a booth there, and we’ll be making appointments for Free PR Exams.   Here’s the link to the Expo http://www.maconferenceforwomen.org/ We’re at Booth #730 across from the Blogging Lounge.  Check out the amazing line up of speakers like Deepak Chopra, Arianna Huffington, Charlotte Beers, Brene Brown, Kristin Chenoweth, Tory Johnson and the many workshops and Small Business Boot Camp!  Hope to see you there!

I started Let’s Make You Shine helping folks as a life coach, and believe without a doubt that how you live your life is how you lead your business. In fact, You Are Your Business. You personify the image of your company, and ultimately the direction it will take.

My own business transformed into PR and visibility strategy because my natural inclination is to help people be the best they can be in life and in their work – whether a budding entrepreneur, small business owner, or expert  in the marketplace.

Each of us has a gift to share that lights us up when we’re engaged and ultimately serves a greater purpose – though we don’t often see it immediately.  But when we do, kazam! All the pieces of the puzzle seem to fit together.

Getting press is fun for me, and I love helping others do the same.  There are so many hungry reporters looking for people like you and me to share their stories, insight and wisdom about every subject imaginable. I am reminded of the definition of an expert from one of my mentors;

An expert is someone who knows more than ten (10) people on the street.

Here’s a story I contributed to for Women & Co at Citibank.com. It’s about How to Hire a Life Coach: it directly relates to You Are Your Business!

‘Getting out there’ means expanding your horizons and making new connections.

Make the quantum leap from behind your computer into the spotlight. I’m happy to hold space for you.

 

For Women & Co. by Mercedes Cardona, OMH Communications
Once a year, you probably have to sweat out the annual employee performance review. And, if your employer is doing it right, it’s not only when you find out how much of a raise you’re getting, but where you stand and where you’re going in your career.

A glowing performance review is always a good experience, but a negative one doesn’t have to be a setback. You can turn a bad review into an opportunity to grow and improve your career if you handle it the right way. “Plenty of highly successful performers have had a not-so-stellar review at some point in their career,” says Nancy Sherr, life coach and owner of A Zestful Life in New York.

The first priority is to stay calm and objective—a tall order after hearing negatives about yourself, but it’s important if you’re going to be constructive going forward. “By handling the interaction in good form, you’ll illuminate your ability to remain professional in what may be a challenging situation,” Sherr says. “Becoming defensive, argumentative, angry, or sobbing will not lead to a positive outcome.”

The easiest way to remain calm is not to respond right away. Most employers will give you a copy of your performance review in writing for your records, so sit with it and really pay attention to the critique. Then, ask your supervisor to explain what his or her expectations are: What exactly would have earned you a good review on each point?

“Let it sink in,” says Linda Wright of Wright Co-Active Coaching. “A lot times if you’re handed a bad review, you see it as: ‘You’ve done poorly and everything is wrong.’ Well,” she points out, “that may not be the case. It may be one area where you need to work.”

How to respond is another issue. Experts disagree on whether to contest the substance of the review. Unless you have some specific achievements you want to point out that were overlooked, arguing that the criticism is unfair can be counterproductive. After all, it is based on the impressions of your supervisor about how you perform within the company.

It is a good idea, however, to set up a time to sit with your supervisor and develop a plan to work on the weak spots that were mentioned in the review. “Everyone is not super-duper at everything,” says Robin Samora, president of Let’s Make You Shine. “It’s a good idea for the supervisor to be able to expand on your strengths and offer suggestions for things they think you can do. You can also ask what development programs are available in the company.”

A negative performance review doesn’t have to be a setback.

If you’re told you’re having trouble expressing yourself or participating at meetings, you can ask if the company will help you join a training group such as Toastmasters. If it’s technical or language skills, maybe your boss can help you line up training or classes. The bottom line is: You need to own up to the trouble spots and offer ways to improve.

During the performance review, listen carefully and ask questions, but frame them in a positive manner: “What would have been a better solution?” is better than “What would you rather have had me do?” A good manager will perceive your interest and focus as a good sign, says Sherr.

Samora recalled once in her twenties when she got a 2% raise that she felt was smaller than she deserved. So she set up a meeting, asked her boss to reconsider, and she not only got a bigger raise, but a confidence boost, as well. “There’s always a nice way to say everything, even when it’s unpleasant,” she says. “You have to be able to stand up for yourself.”

Wrap up your meeting by setting up a timeframe to check in again with the boss to ask about your progress. Regular check-ins should be a part of your routine, anyway.

Negative reviews rarely come out of left field, say experts. If they do, it can be a sign that there’s something wrong in the workplace or how you fit into it. If that’s the case, you need to take inventory and decide how to move on. It can be asking for a transfer to another department—or maybe starting a job search.

“You can tell if the supervisor is willing to work with you or not,” says Wright. “If they gave you a bad review and just want to get rid of you, you’re going to know that.”

For Women & Co. by Mercedes Cardona, OMH Communications

Need a little direction in your life or career? Is that rut you’ve been in feeling less like a rough patch and more like a lifestyle? It might be time to call in a professional.

“It’s a good idea to look for a life coach when you’re stuck, you seem to be spinning your wheels, and your gut tells you there’s something more, and that you need to make a change,” said Robin Samora, president of Let’s Make You Shine in Boston, MA.

So what do life coaches do, exactly? Generally, they help you clarify your life and career goals and develop a plan to make them happen. A coach will help you set up the steps you need to take and follow up—either in person, by phone, or online—as you work through each step. You will need to do the work, but the coach will serve as a guide and facilitator.

“A life coach is to a therapist as a personal trainer is to a doctor,” said Nancy Sherr, life coach and owner of A Zestful Life. “Life coaches work on forward momentum and goal-attainment tailored to the client.” (There are times, however, when you may need some extra-professional help. If you suffer from burnout, and you think depression may be a factor, you should talk to your doctor and work with a therapist.)

The costs of coaching vary widely, depending on the region of the country and the coach’s experience and credentials. In a major city like New York or Los Angeles, $150 to $300 a session or $500 to $1,000 a month is not unreasonable for top coaches, said John McGrail, life coach and author of The Synthesis Effect: Your Direct Path to Personal Power and Transformation (Career Press, 2012).

Many coaches create packages or have sliding-scale fees to accommodate clients with all ranges of income. Coach Steffi Black in Toronto said she charges $90 per session to students and the unemployed, and $150 for working clients. Her three-month intensive package, including email and phone follow-up, starts at $1,200.

So how do you find the right coach to make your investment pay?

Coaching is not a licensed profession, but there are a number of coaching organizations that offer training and certification. Most coaches will belong to one or more of them, and these organizations are a good place to start looking, advises Keri Kuerbis Lehmann, a coach in the San Francisco area. The International Coach Federation will help you find certified coaches, but contacting coaching schools will give you a clearer view of the coach’s philosophy, she said. The ICF has a referral service and membership directory online and a tip sheet with sample questions to ask a prospective coach.

A life coach is to a therapist as a personal trainer is to a doctor.

Most coaches will offer a complimentary session to see if there’s a fit between coach and client, notes Amelia Gandomi Lewis, owner and coach of Advance Yourself Coaching. “Do you feel an instant rapport and understanding with the coach, or as if you are talking to someone from another planet? Your instincts will tell you if it feels right,” she said.

McGrail advises making sure you find someone who works in the areas you want to improve, and ask for referrals to past clients you can talk to. “If a potential coach will not offer you a chance to talk with clients with whom they have worked on similar issues,” he said, “in two words—don’t go!”

McGrail also suggests looking for someone who will not only teach you how to get where you want to be, but also show you the tools to work on your own, not expect you to stay dependent on them. “Someone who keeps you hanging on and writing checks may not be as interested in your empowerment as in filling their pockets with your money,” he said.

It’s been a whirlwind of a month, with two of my family – three if you count a waggy tail, moving. Change and new beginnings come for many of us in September –sometimes like the wind. I remind myself and my clients, that the Chinese symbol for challenge and opportunity is the same. Perhaps fear and excitement may be opposite sides of the same coin as well. I prefer to be excited, rather than fearful, and to expect the unexpected!

With the recent change, I’ve been lucky to be spending more time at my lake house, and enjoying uninterrupted time here on the island with the freedom and flexibility I so cherish, helping clients with their business and PR strategy, visibility (and profitability) in the marketplace. It’s also been the busiest month of the year with my promotions business, www.partnerpromotionsinc.com, with over 80 street team events in 21 days for a Fortune 100 client.

I’ve been writing more as well, and have been featured on a few different marketing blogs and articles – one of which is here, an interview with MO.com – “You are your business, so rock it”.

There will be more changes to come, as we also combine the Let’s Make You Shine and Partner Promotions brands this Fall. It’s an especially exciting project, as we celebrate our 10 year anniversary in the promotions business.  We’re now working with entrepreneurs and small businesses – as well as bigger brands like Xfinity and Blue Man Group to expand their brands. It’s very clear that the same promotion principles of marketing apply; execution and fulfillment may just be different.

I’m on island time till October 1 – so feel free to call or email me if you have a marketing or PR question, or want to discuss an idea.

I just love September, you?

PS – Please click here and listen to Annette Naif, my Guest Expert on the Let’s Make You Shine Interview series.  Annette is a premier Event Planner, and Founder and Co-Chairman of the Event Planners Association for the New York City Chapter.   She produces upscale, seamless events nationwide, and the scope of her work include conferences, retreats, tours, incentive programs, sales meetings, galas, as well as parties – for a fun crowd.

Annette’s upbeat energy and bold passion for her work is her legendary trademark recognized by many of her clients throughout her career; Sebastian International, Sony Pictures, Columbia Pictures, Lakeshore Entertainment, Loeb & Loeb, Tamares Real Estate, MetLife and many others.

As seen at M.O. What’s Yours

MO: What influenced your decision to use your expertise in specifically helping entrepreneurs?

Robin: I’ve been an entrepreneur since I was a little girl, selling potholders on my bike and Girl Scout cookies door to door. Both of my parents were also entrepreneurs, so it was natural for me to think about business, and we talked about it all the time. I didn’t realize how much I could help the small business owner until I looked at my own experience helping major Fortune 500 corporations expand their brands, to get attention. I realized the ideas and principles were the same, only on a smaller scale. I love the fact that the entrepreneur has a dream, a vision, and passion to make it happen. This excited me because I could use my experience and creativity to help them succeed, and feel the impact personally.

MO: What are some tips for a new business looking to expand their brand and increase visibility in a crowded marketplace?

Robin: This could be a half day seminar – but here are some thoughts! First, above all — you are your brand. Let people know who you are, and get out in the marketplace. Get out from your computer. Be comfortable with promoting yourself, everywhere you go. Attend networking events, have a non-traditional approach to meeting people, and be open to try new strategies for connecting. Engage in social media just 30 minutes a day. Make HARO.com (Help a Reporter Out) your best friend to get press mentions. Write articles for industry journals, and a blog to increase your SEO. Get a feature story in your local paper, set up open office hours at a coffee shop and use a laptop ad to promote your business. Show your expertise any way you can and don’t be embarrassed to promote yourself. Your main business should be getting your name out there in business, and in your community. This will give you a competitive advantage. Be consistent, make the time to expand your brand, and be true to who you are. Love yourself, love your business!

MO: Can you provide some advice that entrepreneurs can gain credibility and PR as an expert in their field?

Robin: My advice to gain credibility as an expert is to be proactive and seek out opportunities to get press, and be featured as an expert. The internet is your oyster. Be a guest blogger, be interviewed on Blog Talk radio, answer questions in business journals, get speaking gigs about your expert topic — even if you’re speaking to a small audience. Lead a panel, share the platform on a webinar, be a guest on a teleseminar series, post on other people’s blogs as an expert. Teach a class. Take all of your press mentions, and everything you’ve done and include it on your website, and link it to your social media accounts. The bigger your footprint, the more you will be recognized. The added bonus is that you become more confident, and believe in yourself as the expert you really are.

MO: What inspired you to create the, Let’s Make You Shine Fund, which empowers young women with a gift, to further their education? What kind of impact have you seen the fund make so far?

Robin: This is my inaugural year with the Let’s Make You Shine Fund. I’ve always believed that we all have gifts, and when you give back and share, you get so much. My first recipient will be using her scholarship to attend Holy Cross College. She was an exceptional candidate, and her plans are to study medicine. My only request is that she, and all others who are recipients, pay it forward at some point in their lives. If each one of us shares their gifts and pays it forward what a better world this will be.

MO: What are some examples that you help your clients be big and bold for getting the best results? Not sure I understand this – but here goes

Robin: I like to co-create opportunity and visibility plans with my clients and listen to their hopes and dreams for their business. We look at where they are, where they want to go, and where they’d like to be noticed. We’re all so busy in our own world that we sometimes can’t see the forest through the trees. My passion is to take my client’s vision, show them a path and ideas on how to meet their goals and objectives. Then it’s all about inspired action to get results.

MO: What’s the most exciting thing on the horizon for you personally or professionally?

Robin: I’m working now on developing a plan to help entrepreneurs get more media coverage. It’s exciting , and a great opportunity to build my own brand. Everyone deserves to shine.

By Victoria Stagg Elliott, amednews staff. Posted Sept. 10, 2012

Online marketing strategies are important, but experts on marketing medical practices say it takes more than a virtual presence to persuade people to visit a particular physician and tell friends and family to do the same. Practices may have to use some good, old-fashioned paper, metal or plastic to get out various messages.

“Patients are seeing 10,000 messages a day,” said Steven V. Dubin, president of PR Works in Kingston, Mass., who works with medical practices “If you want yours to break through the clutter, you need to make sure it’s high-impact and in different forms.”

Such marketing efforts do not have to consume large amounts of money or staff time. Actually, some of these six quick and cheap ways to get the message out are deceptively simple.

1. “Open to new patients” sign. A physician’s current patients may be his or her biggest fans, but they may not know the practice has room for more. A sign in the waiting room saying something along the lines of “Your referrals are among the highest forms of flattery” or “We are accepting referrals at this time. We appreciate recommendations to your friends, family and co-workers,” may persuade current patients to help spread the word.

“A lot of people won’t think of referring until you ask them to,” said Robin Samora, founder and president of Let’s Make You Shine, Business and PR Strategy, a public relations firm in Boston. “You need to tell them you have an opening in the practice.”

The sign should be professionally created out of metal or plastic. Handwritten signage can look tacky and be a turnoff, public relations experts said.

2. Tchotchkes. Another suggestion from experts on marketing medical practices is to offer an item that is appropriate for the practice and that patients would like to use. For example, a pediatric practice could give children silicone wristbands to promote awareness of various health-related causes. Calendars and magnets with the practice’s name and address may work. Practices encouraging physical fitness may do well handing out branded pedometers.

“Practices need to consider their target market and how they are going to reach them,” Samora said.

These tchotchkes may serve as reminders to current patients about the practice, but others also might see the information. For example, a refrigerator magnet may be an easy way for a patient to find a practice’s phone number, but it also could be noticed by visitors.

3. Office open house. Depending on the type of practice, an open house could show established patients that they are appreciated and introduce the office to potential patients. The open house may include an educational component, such as a brief presentation by a physician, or minor health screenings, such as blood pressure checks by other office staff. Or it may be a chance for patients to sit down casually with a physician to discuss philosophy of care. An open house also many be an opportunity for a practice to show off a redesign or new equipment.

“This can be a learning opportunity for both parties,” Samora said. “Patients get to ask questions, and physicians learn what the common questions are.”

These events can be promoted through communication with patients who are asked to invite friends and relatives.

4. Public speaking event. Community organizations usually are looking for speakers, which means opportunities for physicians to talk about their areas of expertise. This, in turn, can make the practice more attractive to current patients and bring in new ones. Marketing experts advocate talking to audiences who mirror the kind of patients the practice is hoping to attract.

“Give your knowledge away,” said Rina Shah, principal and founder of Rilax Strategies, a communications consultancy based in Washington. “What you know about medicine and wellness is interesting and valuable to others. Offer to speak at local health expos, to women’s groups or business clubs on a topic related to public health. You will gain valuable exposure.”

5. “Buck slip.” A billing statement can do more than ask for money. It can include a “buck slip,” or dollar-sized piece of paper with information about the practice, available services, honors the physician may have received recently and requests for referrals.

“You’re already sending out the piece of mail,” Dubin said. “You might as well take advantage of that.”

These may be created simply and cheaply on office word processing software and then photocopied and cut to size. Or they can be more complicated and glossy if ordered from an online printing house for about $100 per 500.

6. “We miss you” mailing or phone call. Attracting patients to a practice is sometimes less about persuading new ones to come in but more about reminding established ones to return. Patients who have not had contact with the practice for a certain amount of time can be mailed a letter or called by staffers. Some patients may have moved or gone through other changes that mean that it is more appropriate to go elsewhere. Or visiting a doctor may have just slipped their minds.

“People are busy and have lives that are moving at a million miles a minute,” Shah said. “It’s important to get them to think of your practice.”

Experts on marketing medical practices say these efforts should fit in with a plan that includes virtual as well as real-world strategies. All messages should be consistent and suit the practice.


Elliott covers practice management issues. She can be reached at 312-464-5577 or by email (victoria.elliott@ama-assn.org).

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of attending the MED (Minority Enterprise Development) Day in Boston, learning more about the benefits of being a WBE (Women’s Business Enterprise) in the state of Massachusetts. I was thrilled to be certified to develop coaching and branding strategies, and find additional ways to grow my business!

At the convention, I met a radio producer who interviewed me about a year ago. His show was called Radio Entrepreneurs, and we talked about setting up a time to discuss Let’s Make You Shine.

Knowing I would be on-air as soon as next week, I revised a list of Radio Interview Do’s and Don’ts that may be useful for your own media training:

Easy Guidelines for Creating A Powerful Radio Interview

  • A picture is worth a thousand words, but your listener can’t “see”. Speak in terms of vibrant images and make sure to use details. Think of ways to describe what you’re talking about so your audience can “see” for themselves.
  • Start with a bang! Talk about something you find interesting, so your listeners will too! Don’t build your talk brick by brick, start strong. Making a positive impression straight from the gate can be a deciding factor in whether the listener tunes in, or out. You want them tuned in and tuned on!
  • Don’t fib. Today’s audience can tell when you aren’t being authentic. A sensitive subject? Learn to sway gracefully, but still hold integrity.
  • Please don’t bore your audience to death. Stand up when you talk – put your game face on and enjoy your time on stage as an expert. If you’re sleep talking, they’ll be walking. They snooze, you lose.
  • Have an important conflict and afraid reschedule? Think twice. If you’re feeling OFF, you’ll most likely come across that way. Better to be 100% IN than 60% OFF. Be media ready.
  • Do some R & D on the station where you’ll be featured. What’s the format? The host’s style? Make it a point to know the culture of the station as best as possible, before your interview.
  • Put yourself in the listener’s shoes. What makes you an expert? What’s happened in your life that can be used as example? What challenges have you overcome and what can you teach others? What’s your story and why would someone want to listen? Be memorable.
  • Don’t be intimidated by the radio host; in truth, they’re just like you and me, with a different job. Not crazy about a question they ask? Learn about the Art of Transition in Radio, and how to get from one sensitive subject to the next without being rude or self-centered. (Interested? Email me for a few subject transition tips).

And finally, be yourself when you’re on air. That’s all you are, have been and ever will be. If you’re an entrepreneur or professional looking to get more visibility and the media knocks on your door (or you boldy seek it xo), be prepared. Go for it. Chances are you’ve got everything to gain, and not a darn thing to lose.