It’s been a whirlwind of a month, with two of my family – three if you count a waggy tail, moving. Change and new beginnings come for many of us in September –sometimes like the wind. I remind myself and my clients, that the Chinese symbol for challenge and opportunity is the same. Perhaps fear and excitement may be opposite sides of the same coin as well. I prefer to be excited, rather than fearful, and to expect the unexpected!

With the recent change, I’ve been lucky to be spending more time at my lake house, and enjoying uninterrupted time here on the island with the freedom and flexibility I so cherish, helping clients with their business and PR strategy, visibility (and profitability) in the marketplace. It’s also been the busiest month of the year with my promotions business, www.partnerpromotionsinc.com, with over 80 street team events in 21 days for a Fortune 100 client.

I’ve been writing more as well, and have been featured on a few different marketing blogs and articles – one of which is here, an interview with MO.com – “You are your business, so rock it”.

There will be more changes to come, as we also combine the Let’s Make You Shine and Partner Promotions brands this Fall. It’s an especially exciting project, as we celebrate our 10 year anniversary in the promotions business.  We’re now working with entrepreneurs and small businesses – as well as bigger brands like Xfinity and Blue Man Group to expand their brands. It’s very clear that the same promotion principles of marketing apply; execution and fulfillment may just be different.

I’m on island time till October 1 – so feel free to call or email me if you have a marketing or PR question, or want to discuss an idea.

I just love September, you?

PS – Please click here and listen to Annette Naif, my Guest Expert on the Let’s Make You Shine Interview series.  Annette is a premier Event Planner, and Founder and Co-Chairman of the Event Planners Association for the New York City Chapter.   She produces upscale, seamless events nationwide, and the scope of her work include conferences, retreats, tours, incentive programs, sales meetings, galas, as well as parties – for a fun crowd.

Annette’s upbeat energy and bold passion for her work is her legendary trademark recognized by many of her clients throughout her career; Sebastian International, Sony Pictures, Columbia Pictures, Lakeshore Entertainment, Loeb & Loeb, Tamares Real Estate, MetLife and many others.

By Victoria Stagg Elliott, amednews staff. Posted Sept. 10, 2012

Online marketing strategies are important, but experts on marketing medical practices say it takes more than a virtual presence to persuade people to visit a particular physician and tell friends and family to do the same. Practices may have to use some good, old-fashioned paper, metal or plastic to get out various messages.

“Patients are seeing 10,000 messages a day,” said Steven V. Dubin, president of PR Works in Kingston, Mass., who works with medical practices “If you want yours to break through the clutter, you need to make sure it’s high-impact and in different forms.”

Such marketing efforts do not have to consume large amounts of money or staff time. Actually, some of these six quick and cheap ways to get the message out are deceptively simple.

1. “Open to new patients” sign. A physician’s current patients may be his or her biggest fans, but they may not know the practice has room for more. A sign in the waiting room saying something along the lines of “Your referrals are among the highest forms of flattery” or “We are accepting referrals at this time. We appreciate recommendations to your friends, family and co-workers,” may persuade current patients to help spread the word.

“A lot of people won’t think of referring until you ask them to,” said Robin Samora, founder and president of Let’s Make You Shine, Business and PR Strategy, a public relations firm in Boston. “You need to tell them you have an opening in the practice.”

The sign should be professionally created out of metal or plastic. Handwritten signage can look tacky and be a turnoff, public relations experts said.

2. Tchotchkes. Another suggestion from experts on marketing medical practices is to offer an item that is appropriate for the practice and that patients would like to use. For example, a pediatric practice could give children silicone wristbands to promote awareness of various health-related causes. Calendars and magnets with the practice’s name and address may work. Practices encouraging physical fitness may do well handing out branded pedometers.

“Practices need to consider their target market and how they are going to reach them,” Samora said.

These tchotchkes may serve as reminders to current patients about the practice, but others also might see the information. For example, a refrigerator magnet may be an easy way for a patient to find a practice’s phone number, but it also could be noticed by visitors.

3. Office open house. Depending on the type of practice, an open house could show established patients that they are appreciated and introduce the office to potential patients. The open house may include an educational component, such as a brief presentation by a physician, or minor health screenings, such as blood pressure checks by other office staff. Or it may be a chance for patients to sit down casually with a physician to discuss philosophy of care. An open house also many be an opportunity for a practice to show off a redesign or new equipment.

“This can be a learning opportunity for both parties,” Samora said. “Patients get to ask questions, and physicians learn what the common questions are.”

These events can be promoted through communication with patients who are asked to invite friends and relatives.

4. Public speaking event. Community organizations usually are looking for speakers, which means opportunities for physicians to talk about their areas of expertise. This, in turn, can make the practice more attractive to current patients and bring in new ones. Marketing experts advocate talking to audiences who mirror the kind of patients the practice is hoping to attract.

“Give your knowledge away,” said Rina Shah, principal and founder of Rilax Strategies, a communications consultancy based in Washington. “What you know about medicine and wellness is interesting and valuable to others. Offer to speak at local health expos, to women’s groups or business clubs on a topic related to public health. You will gain valuable exposure.”

5. “Buck slip.” A billing statement can do more than ask for money. It can include a “buck slip,” or dollar-sized piece of paper with information about the practice, available services, honors the physician may have received recently and requests for referrals.

“You’re already sending out the piece of mail,” Dubin said. “You might as well take advantage of that.”

These may be created simply and cheaply on office word processing software and then photocopied and cut to size. Or they can be more complicated and glossy if ordered from an online printing house for about $100 per 500.

6. “We miss you” mailing or phone call. Attracting patients to a practice is sometimes less about persuading new ones to come in but more about reminding established ones to return. Patients who have not had contact with the practice for a certain amount of time can be mailed a letter or called by staffers. Some patients may have moved or gone through other changes that mean that it is more appropriate to go elsewhere. Or visiting a doctor may have just slipped their minds.

“People are busy and have lives that are moving at a million miles a minute,” Shah said. “It’s important to get them to think of your practice.”

Experts on marketing medical practices say these efforts should fit in with a plan that includes virtual as well as real-world strategies. All messages should be consistent and suit the practice.


Elliott covers practice management issues. She can be reached at 312-464-5577 or by email (victoria.elliott@ama-assn.org).

By Shaunna Gately
MILTON —Strategist Robin Samora helps professionals, entrepreneurs and small businesses with the launch of her new personal coaching business Let’s Make You Shine. The Milton resident started the business coaching service last June, as part of her event planning and marketing firm Partner Promotions Inc.

During her 20-year career as a business strategist, Samora worked with many large corporations. But she said she started Let’s Make You Shine as a way to give back to aspiring entrepreneurs who need solid business advice.

Samora reviews different aspects of a client’s business, including what is being done in the marketplace and how her clients are presenting themselves. Samora goes a step further to develop a rapport with her clients to help manage their day-to-day struggles as well as their long-term goals.

“I help people that are ready to make a difference and do something big with their life,” Samora said. “That’s the kind of person that I like to work with. I’ve worked a lot with my own coaches … and I think that’s what really opened my eyes, is learning about really what’s serving you in your life and what’s not.”

Samora meets with her clients for a couple of two-hour sessions each month, and tries to hold her clients accountable for sticking with the strategic plans they develop.

Samora has been taking her business savvy on the road by hosting a business strategy tour, a series of informal talks at coffee houses throughout the Boston area.

The events are coined “Make Money Mondays” and are part of her push to spread the word about her new business. Samora’s tours finish at the end of June but will resume in September.

“I’ve worked with all different kinds of people to help motivate them, to get them where they need to go,” Samora said. “When they finish with me, my goal is for them to see themselves in such a different light and they are just beside themselves, so happy.”

Shaunna Gately may be reached at sgately@ledger.com.

Read more: http://www.patriotledger.com/article/20110510/NEWS/305109255/